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What happens to your old window frames?

What happens to your old window frames?

What happens to your old window frames?

Date: 04/10/2017

What happens to old window frames?

Did you know that in 1997 79% of windows removed were wood, just 3% were uPVC. Going forward to 2015, only 24% of windows taken out were wood and 45% were uPVC. Now in 2017 it is forecasted that 70% of all window replacements will be uPVC, essentially ‘replacements of replacements’ because windows first fitted in the 80’s and 90’s are now becoming old and less efficient (Palmer Report 2015). With this large increase in uPVC production, what happens to the tons of waste uPVC? In this blog post we are going to take you through the process of how we responsibly recycle your old uPVC windows.

The plan for recycling your old uPVC windows starts before your windows are even removed. When one of our surveyors visits your home, part of their survey is dedicated to what windows need to be removed and where they will need to be recycled. This is to ensure that the windows can be sent to the right place to be recycled. When the windows are removed they will be taken to a local branch and recycled with one of our recycling partners which are LKM in Kent, Broughshire in South Wales and Merritts in Midlands.

Did you know: The same uPVC material can be recycled 10 times, meaning the same material of a window can be used for over 300 years!

LKM and Broughshire take uPVC and other frame materials including aluminium, timber and steel. The aluminium and steel is re-smelted, the timber is turned into chipboard and uPVC is re-extruded to make various products. Merritts only take uPVC which they grind and re-extrude which can then be turned into other PVCu products and materials.

Did you know: We also recycle the glass from our windows which is often turned into jars and bottles. 

What could your old uPVC windows be recycled into?

1. As a replacement for other materials - uPVC is fantastic for replicating the use of other materials such as cast iron and timber.

2. Pipes - uPVC is the most common material for plastic piping because of its resistance and smooth texture.

3. Medical equipment - uPVC is often used in medical and dental equipment such as retainers, so you could be wearing your old windows.

4. Garden furniture - Due to its effective resistance to the elements, uPVC is a fantastic choice for garden furniture which needs to withstand the elements.

5. Toys - uPVC is a great material choice for toys because of its strength and versatility.

Everest Scrappage Scheme

Right now we'll give you up to £4,000 off your old windows to use against new ones with the Everest Scrappage Scheme. To find out more click here.