Today's opening times:

9.30am - 8pm

Accessibility links

How to clean uPVC window frames

How to clean uPVC window frames


Date: 07/08/2015

There are pros and cons with every window material and the greatest selling point of uPVC windows is that the material is virtually maintenance free.

Unplasticized Polyvinyl Chloride, or uPVC for short, is manufactured to an extremely high quality and it will not rot, rust, peel or flake. The material comes in a wide range of different colours and finishes, but is most popular in white. Even so, white uPVC windows maintain a clean, fresh look all year round, and all that is required is an occasional wipe with warm soapy water to keep it looking at its best.

That is all there is to it!

We get it, though. You’ve just spent a good chunk of change on new windows and you want to make sure you can keep them looking as good as new for as long as possible.

Take a look at our list of quick tips to help do just that.

Step 1. The best form of maintenance is always prevention, so keep an eye on your windows regularly to see if they are suffering from the debris of surrounding trees or leaks from any damaged pipes and guttering.

Depending on what surrounds a window, as well as the local weather in any given region, windows can be subject to a whole range of different wear and tear.

Step 2.  We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again – warm soapy water and a soft cloth or sponge will be perfect for wiping your uPVC windows clean.

An occasional wipe will keep your windows looking great. If you prefer to use a named product, there are plenty available, but cif / jif are incredibly popular.

Step 3. Do your homework: Before you even consider buying replacement windows, look at the guarantees offered by different companies.

All good window suppliers will offer long guarantees on both the window and the material itself, and if a company offers lengthy guarantees against workmanship and discolouration, you’ll know you can sit back and relax in the knowledge that you not only have such low maintenance windows, but that you’ll be covered should anything go wrong.

For further information on windows, look at the Everest Windows Buying Guide.