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How to secure your home


How To Secure Your Home

For domestic burglary, adding layers of ‘annoyance’ is going to deter an average break in. To protect your home, follow our suggestions of how to secure your home cheaply and with more expensive ideas.

How to secure your home

Securing your home is a fact of life, with 268,000 police-reported burglaries in the UK. Crime levels might vary across regions and areas, but everyone should follow good practices in their home to make it more secure, no matter where they live.


The majority of break ins happen during the week and when it’s dark. This makes it more likely that the homeowner is in the property with 64% of burglaries taking place when someone is at home. This doesn’t mean you can be complacent when you are on holiday or even during the day – 20% of burglaries are during the afternoon.


Besides the financial loss, the emotional impact can be enough to cause ongoing distress. 84% of burglary victims were emotionally affected with 40% experiencing fear and 35% feeling vulnerable and a loss of confidence.


Surprisingly, 59% of intruders gain entrance to a property through the front door.


The following is a guide on how to secure your home, with a lot of tips for securing your home cheaply by following common sense.

How to secure your home without an alarm


How to secure your home infographic

How to secure your home infographic


The reality is that if someone ‘really’ wants to break into your house then they will most likely find a way. But for most domestic burglaries, adding levels and layers of ‘annoyance’ is going to deter an average break in.


The more layers you can add to your security, the more likely a burglar will think twice before choosing your home to break in.


SBD windows

Install Secured by Design accredited windows, especially on the ground floor (see below).

Cost level ****


SBD door

Install Secured by Design accredited doors (see below).

Cost level ****


Fake burglar alarm wall-mounted box

Installing a fake alarm box is almost indiscernible to a full security system so can be highly effective to deter a burglar from scoping your property.

Cost level *


A spyhole and door chain

Should be standard practice for any front door, especially for elderly or vulnerable people. And, don’t forget to always use the chain.

Cost level *


Gravel around the house

Noise is a great deterrent for a burglar. Gravel makes plenty of crunches and can alert someone inside to anyone snooping around their property, especially at night. Turning on your lights might be enough to chase an intruder away.

Cost level ***


Internal lights on timers

An empty house can be a target for a break in so if you are away, a simple light timer can give the illusion that someone is home. Also, asking a neighbour to park their car on your drive can be a simple deterrent.

Cost level *


Motion-sensor lighting

The majority of burglaries happen in the dark. Shine a light on anyone who is lurking around your home and it makes it far more difficult for them to attempt a break in.

Cost level ***


Prickly bushes under the windows

Making life as difficult for a break in as possible can be enough to make sure your home is passed over by an intruder. Restricting access to your windows with prickly bushes that make it very difficult to get access to the window can be a huge deterrent.

Cost level **


Trim hedges

Burglars love secluded areas for privacy to work. Make sure that any hedges or fences are not too high and that the front of your home can be seen from the road or by a neighbour.

Cost level *


Lock gates

It might seem obvious, but it’s often the small things we overlook. Putting locks on side or back gates is another level of restriction.

Cost level *


Lock up your tools and ladders

Most burglars don’t carry tools to avoid looking suspicious or in case they are stopped by the police. Instead, they will break into garages and sheds to use whatever they can find lying around. Crowbars and tools, ladders and steps should all be locked away and not left lying around.

Cost level *


Secure the garage and sheds

Make sure your garages and sheds have the same level of security that the house does. As we mentioned above, burglars target sheds to find tools or ladders they can use to get into the house.

Cost level **

Window security

What makes a window secure? infographic

What makes a window secure? infographic


SBD accredited window

To reduce crime, new build homes must be fitted with windows that achieve PAS 24: 2016 to be Document Q compliant with Building Regulations.


Some windows also offer Secured by Design (SBD) accreditation, a crime-reducing initiative backed by the UK Police. SBD will ensure you have the best window security without going to extreme measures (such as window grills).


Lockable handles

uPVC windows usually offer lockable handles as a standard along with multi-point locking systems, making them a secure choice. All windows can be fitted with handles that lock, so they can’t be easily opened.


Window with a night latch for ventilation

Most windows usually have options to allow the window to be left open on a small ventilation gap, make sure the catch is secure enough that it can’t be prised open.


Hinge protectors

Look for windows that have a protective strip or security brackets along the hinge side of the window that stop an attack on the window hinges.


Internally beaded glazing

A window pane can be removed if the glazing is on the exterior of the frame. Your windows should have internal glazing beads.


Laminated glass

For an extra level of security on glazed doors or sidelights, laminated glass has an internal PVB layer that makes it more difficult to break.

Get Secured by Design Windows

Everest windows are rigorously tested to the latest British Security Standards

Door security

What makes a door secure? infographic

What makes a door secure? infographic


Everest does not supply sash jammers or hinge bolts. Letterbox fishing guards and door chains are an optional extra.



SBD accredited door

To reduce crime, new build homes must be fitted with doors that achieve PAS 24: 2016 to be Document Q compliant with Building Regulations. Some doors and locks also offer Secured by Design accreditation.


Anti-snap locks on uPVC doors

Older uPVC doors featured euro cylinder locks that had a vulnerability to lock-snapping, make sure to check that your cylinder locks have a cylinder guard fitted, have the TS007 3 Star Kitemark or the Sold Secure Diamond Standard (SS312).


Deadbolt locks

Most uPVC doors have multi-point locking systems that incorporate a deadlock. For other types of door, especially timber, make sure that you have a deadlock as a secondary lock with a BSI kitemark of BS 3621.


Sash jammers

All doors can benefit from a sash jammer that acts as a bolt at the back of the door making it far more difficult to kick a door open. Some sash jammers are key operated which allows you to lock them when you leave the house.


Door alarm

An alarm on the door will make an audible sound to alert you that the door has been opened.


Letterbox fishing guard

Using an extendable rod to hook keys left on a table near the door is a common method of burglars. A Secured by Design accredited fishing guard will protect your letterbox. As a precaution, never leave keys on a hallway table, a wall-mounted key rack or on display.

Get Secured by Design Doors

Everest doors have industry-leading security features to meet PAS 24: 2016 standard

Burglar alarm and CCTV home security systems

In addition to the tips for securing your home without an alarm, adding a home security system will add another layer that can avoid a break in at your home.


Noise is a great deterrent for intruders, so an alarm does help to scare away anyone trying to gain access.


If your house is being scoped for a break in, burglar alarm boxes and visible CCTV cameras will be noted and can be enough to keep intruders away.


Fake cameras and burglar boxes can be a visible deterrent, but they need to look realistic!


Burglars will often knock on the door to see if anyone is home before they break in. In addition to an alarm, smart doorbells will alert you remotely when someone rings your door or approaches your house. If you are out during the day, or on holiday you can be aware if anyone suspicious is lurking at the front door.



When is a burglary most likely to happen?

When is a burglary most likely to happen? infographic

When is a burglary most likely to happen? infographic



What attracts burglars to homes?

Burglars want the least amount of risk with the biggest reward. So, for average houses, they are looking for a home that has the least amount of annoyance and hindrance. The more layers you can add to deterrence, the more likely a burglar is going to avoid your home.


The main things that a burglar will look for to case a house for break in are:

  • A house with a clear and open getaway, for example, next to an alleyway
  • Entrances front or back are obscured from neighbours by trees, hedges or by design
  • Windows are left open and/or unlocked showing lax security
  • Valuables are on display as an advertisement of what is on offer
  • House is empty during the day consistently
  • Signs of being unoccupied such as an unkempt garden
  • Signs of being on holiday such as mail, newspapers and lights left on 24 hours a day
  • Social media posts that you are on holiday
  • Garage doors or sheds are open or don’t have locks
  • No alarm system installed

Don’t forget, any security system is only as secure as the weakest part and that can often be you! Remember to lock doors and windows, set alarms and use precautions when answering the door.


All statistics quoted are from the ONS.

What is PAS 24 & why does it matter?

Make sure you look for this when you buy new windows or doors

Home Security FAQs

  • +
    How can I secure my home cheaply?

    For most domestic burglary, adding levels and layers of ‘annoyance’ is going to deter an average break in. There are plenty of affordable things you can do to add layers to your security, so a burglar will think twice before choosing your home to break in.

    • Fake burglar alarm wall-mounted box
    • Gravel around the house as noise is a great deterrent
    • Prickly bushes under the windows and at boundaries
    • Trim hedges that obscure views to entrance doors
    • Lock up your tools and ladders that can be used
  • +
    What attracts burglars to homes?

    Burglars want the least amount of risk with the biggest reward. So, for average houses they are looking for a home that has the least amount of annoyance and hindrance. The more layers you can add to deterrence, the more likely a burglar is going to avoid your home.


    The main things that a burglar will look for to case a house for break in are:

    • Entrances front or back are obscured from neighbours by trees, hedges or by design
    • Windows are left open and/or unlocked showing lax security
    • Valuables are on display as an advertisement of what is on offer
    • Signs of being on holiday such as mail, newspapers and lights left on 24 hours a day
    • No alarm system installed

At Everest, our Windows and Doors are tested to meet British Standards for Security

Our doors and windows go through rigorous testing to meet standards. Our uPVC, composite and aluminium doors meet PAS 24: 2016 and have Secured by Design accreditation.

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