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What is PAS 24

What is PAS 24 & Why Does it Matter?

PAS is a quality assured standard that offers the buyer confidence when buying an accredited product. In this guide we explain what PAS 24 is and how doors and windows are tested to meet this standard.

What is PAS 24?

What does PAS stand for?


Publicly Available Specification (PAS) is a standard set by an industry to ensure that all manufacturers in an industry are making and selling products that reach the industry benchmark for quality.


There is some confusion over the PAS acronym, as PAS 24-1 was published originally as a Product Assessment Specification – also known as PAS.


Publicly Available Specifications were first published in 2003 and PAS 24 was then published in November 2007 which evolved from the original PAS 24-1.


There are still a few Product Assessment Specifications (PAS) as revisions originally published pre-2002, but most are now withdrawn.


PAS is now officially a BSI acronym for Publicly Available Specification.


PAS is overseen by the BSI (British Standards Institution) who manage the setting and distribution of the PAS standards.


What is a PAS 24 certificate?


PAS 24 is a standard of testing to measure the security performance of windows and doorsets to ensure they can resist a level of attack from an opportunist burglar.


PAS 24: 2016 came into effect on 29 February 2016 and supersedes the previous PAS 24: 2012 which is now withdrawn.


PAS 24: 2016 was developed with collaboration from organizations such as: Association of Chief Police Officers, Association of Composite Door Manufacturers, BRE, British Woodworking Federation, Council for Aluminium in Building, Door and Hardware Federation, Glass and Glazing Federation, Master Locksmiths Association, RIAC Authority, Steel Window Association and others.


We strongly advise that you only buy doors and windows that meet this standard to ensure the quality of the product and its ability to provide a certain level of security. Look out for the BSI logo and the PAS 24: 2016 mark.

Front & Back Doors that meet British Standards

Everest doors have industry-leading security features such as toughened safety glass, security hinges and hook-bolts to meet PAS 24: 2016 standard

Is PAS 24 the same as Secured By Design?


Secured by Design (SBD) is an initiative that organises accreditation for products on behalf of the Police. To be awarded a SBD Standard, the product must meet requirements to prevent crime to a ‘Police Preferred Specification’.


SBD approved products can only be produced by a manufacturer with a Secured by Design license.


PAS 24 and Secured by Design are independent of each other. However, most SBD products must meet PAS 24 standards as a minimum alongside other SBD requirements.



Is PAS 24 a legal requirement?


PAS 24 or an equivalent standard (see below) is now required to meet Building Regulations for new builds properties.



What is Approved Document Q?


Approved Document Q: Security - Dwellings, took effect in October 2015 in England and supports the existing Q1 of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2010.


Building Regulations now require that all new build properties can “resist unauthorised access to any dwelling; and any part of a building from which access can be gained to a flat within the building.”


To pass Regulations, doors and windows must adhere to PAS 24:2016 or one of the similar standards:


Doors:

  • STS 201 Issue 5:2013
  • LPS 1175 Issue 7:2010 security rating 2
  • STS 202 Issue 3:2011 burglary rating 2
  • LPS 2081 Issue 1:2015 rating B

Windows:

  • STS 204 Issue 3:2012
  • LPS 1175 Issue 7:2010 security rating 1
  • LPS 2081 Issue 1:2015 rating A

PAS 24 requirements


To achieve PAS 24:2016, a manufacturer must submit their products to an independent testing company certified by the United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS).


UKAS is the UK regulatory body which ensures that any product testing company is fully compliant in how it performs tests and calibrates its testing equipment.


The testing and certification process also ensures that the manufacturing process is consistently meeting standards. The testing house will regularly visit the manufacturer to check and re-test the products to make sure they are still performing to the standards. Any products awarded with the Standard that have a component changed may have to submit the product for a re-test.


PAS 24 is a minimum standard so it doesn't have a grading system, a window and door either passes and receives accreditation or it doesn't.


To meet PAS requirements, the door or window should meet the following BSI performance criteria:


StandardPartClassification
BS 6375 - 1:2015+A1:2016Part 1Classification for weather tightness and guidance on selection and specification
BS 6375 - 2:2009Part 2Classification for operation and strength characteristics and guidance on selection and specification
BS 6375 - 3:2009+A1:2013Part 3Classification for additional performance characteristics and guidance on selection and specification

BS 6375 replaces PAS 23 which has now been withdrawn. The test is designed to mimic an attack by an opportunistic burglar, using tools which are easy to conceal.


The PAS 24 test

During the PAS 24 test, windows and doors are tested in three key areas:


  • Security: How long does the door or windows keep intruders out of the property?
  • Weather resistance: Does the door or window keep the cold and rain out and reduce draughts?
Everest Windows are PAS 24: 2016 accredited

Everest windows are rigorously tested to the latest British Security Standards

PAS 24 test for windows


Security test

Glazing frame test – the corner of a window is the weakest point, so pressure is applied to each of the four corners to test the strength of the glazing bead and the tensile strength of the glazing itself.


Over a 20 second period, the testing machine applies 200kg.


Mechanical Infill machine pressing 200kg of force against an Everest window

Mechanical infill machine pressing 200kg of force against an Everest window


Mechanical loading test – replicates the action of someone trying to prise open the window and tests the strength of the profile pieces along with the locking mechanisms and other security features.


This test increases the force even further to 300kg, which is applied perpendicular to each piece of hardware. The machine pulls opposing edges in opposite directions with a series of hooks whilst also pushing on the opening sash with a hydraulic press.


A 100kg hydraulic force will then be used to press against the already tested frame to check the window hasn't been weakened by the previous force.


Mechanical loading test pressing against an Everest window with 300kg of force

Mechanical loading test pressing against an Everest window with 300kg of force


Manual test – the engineer has 15 minutes to try and break the window frame. The engineer will use a combination of standardised tools to 'attack' the window to test for vulnerabilities. This may seem like an easy test compared to the 300kg force from the hydraulic press but a manual check can get into all areas of the window frame to ensure no part of the frame has been left untested.


This also best replicates a 'real life' example and uses the methods a burglar would use to get into a property.


An engineer testing an Everest window for any vulnerabilities missed by the machine

An engineer testing an Everest window for any vulnerabilities missed by the machines


Weather resistance test

The window is placed in a pressure chamber where varying levels of air pressure is exerted on the opening sash to simulate wind pressure pressing against the glazing.


The window is sprayed to the exterior face with a jet of water to test for water tightness and check for leakages.


An Everest window being tested for water tightness

An Everest window being tested for water tightness


All of this testing ensures Everest windows are built to the highest standard for security, weather resistance and endurance and that we can make this claim using independent certified organisations.

Entrance Doors that meet British Standards

Everest doors have industry-leading security features such as toughened glass, security hinges and hook-bolts to meet PAS 24: 2016 standard

PAS 24 test for doors


Security test

Mechanical loading test

To test the action of someone trying to prise open the door and to test the strength of the profile pieces along with the locking mechanism and other security features.


A force of 450kg is applied perpendicular to each piece of hardware. The edges are pulled in opposite directions with a series of hooks whilst also pushing on the opening sash with a hydraulic press. This action is applied to multiple points on the door to check there are no vulnerable areas.


The force is applied over a 20-30 second period without shock force and then followed by a further 100kg force from the hydraulic press to push against the already tested frame.


Watch a pendulum impact test in action as we test our bi-fold doors to a force of 200 lbs.


Solid impact test

To test the door's resistance to shock forces.


A sand-filled leather bag weighing 30kg is dropped in a pendulum motion three times. The shock of the sand bag is designed to replicate the door being struck with a uniformed force across a wide area of the door to test the doors general shock resistance.


The bag is dropped from 800mm higher than its resting position.


Hard impact test

To test the doors individual components resistance to shock forces.


A metal battering ram on a pendulum is pulled back and released three times. The shock of the ram is designed to replicate the door being struck with a concentrated force.


The ram weighs 50kg and is dropped from a set height of 800mm higher than its resting position.


Manual test

An engineer has 15 minutes to test the strength and security of the door and lock cylinder.


To simulate a break-in, the engineer uses the most common lock breaking methods such as mole gripping to test the strength of the lock.


A manual intervention test is then used which gives the engineer 15 minutes to break into the door with tools set out by the BSI.


A cut through tool is used to see if the blade can make a significantly sized hole in a door. Two zones of the door are tested: zone one can be defined as anywhere on the door within 400mm vertically either side of the lock; zone two is everywhere else on the door. Each test lasts for 3 minutes and the door will fail if the blade makes a hole greater than 50mm in diameter.


Weather resistance test

The door is placed in a pressure chamber where varying levels of air pressure are exerted on the opening sash to simulate wind pressure pressing against the door. The door is then tested for water tightness by spraying the exterior face with a jet of water and checking for leakages.

Useful resources:


Everest windows and doors are tested to PAS 24:2016 standards by Wintech engineering in Telford.


Everest are accredited by Secured by Design, Made in Britain, Fensa, Quiet Mark, TrustMark, BRFC, FSC, BBA, BSI, CE.

At Everest, our Windows and Doors are tested to meet British Standards for Security

Our doors and windows go through rigorous testing to meet standards. Our uPVC, composite and aluminium doors meet PAS 24:2016 and Secured by Design accreditation.

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